Regardless of when you sabbath, at some time the blessed day is going to fall on Christmas. Back in the 1600s, some of the Puritans in England found this juxtaposition to pose quite a problem. They felt that it was more important to soberly observe the Sabbath than to celebrate Christmas. If you’d like a light read on the subject, I recommend Jeff Guinn’s How Mrs. Claus Saved Christmas (2006), part of his Santa Claus trilogy.

 

It seems that my Jewish friends don’t have a problem observing both sabbaths and regular holy days. If one blends into another, it’s just more good times.

 

More often, though, I find that Christmas rushes by in a blur and Sabbath falls to the wayside. I plan, purchase, wrap, pack, buy, bake, send, decorate — all things I want to do — and worship gets lost. There is no time to rest, no time to pause and celebrate the birthday of my Lord Jesus.

 

The next two weeks will feature time with family – both extended and nuclear. I hope to make a Christmas Eve service, and if not, to rise early to spend some time with my Savior. Christmas Day may find me working in the kitchen, preparing the fatted calf, but I will make time to rejoice. For unto us a child is born! That, my friends, calls for some eggnog.

 

Merry Christmas to all!

 

Megan Willome